Fundementals of Regeneration and Regrowth - Future of Hair restoration

   
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actionreaction

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December 28, 2010, 09:21 PM

Hey WorldHairLoss!

I’m a poster from IH’s site and I feel that this topic belongs here.

I am now almost totally assured that full regrowths are not only a possibility, but are within our current reach for a relatively small amount of money.

What’s the ideal hair treatment to you? for me it would have to be economical, it would need to be efficient, it would have to come without side effects, it would have to give me a total regrowth, it would need to be just that: perfect.  I believe we’ve found it.

I’m developing ideas and building as much knowledge as I can regarding a possible new “helmet” device that will incorporate and switch the regeneration processes that we all possess.  Currently we have the ingenious laser helmet from OMG who’s a huge inspiration for us all, but I’d like more (don’t we all?), and I’m convinced we can achieve that.  It might come as a surprise but the mammalian and amphibian regeneration are truly only different by two things: Nerve density.  Salamanders have a lot more nerves than we have, and they regenerate based on how much nerve damage is sustained in a loop triggered called the current of injury.  It’s a tiny, tiny electric current which triggers a breakdown of cells into their most primitive form: stem cells.  Using silver, copper tripeptides, conductive gel, ampupuncture needles, silver nylon mesh, possibly some sort of wnt medium, and a picoamp (absolutely tiny) producing electrode I believe based on sixty years of the painstaking research of others, that we could have full heads of hair from this.

This might sound a little wacky or whatnot, but if you follow through and read the link / thread I’m going going to be posting at the bottom you will realize just how simple this could be.

The link is all of my research (besides some books I’ve read through) regarding this topic.

As it stands, depending on how involved people like you(!) and OMG, Nid, Immortal and myself are, we could perhaps have this available between us (could care less about marketing it, I just want hair! in fact if OMG is cool with it I’d have him as the spokesperson, he’s a master of not getting pushed around) within two years. 

Again, this is no longer a question of “can we even do it?” anymore, it’s a question of how much effort we put in.

Looking forward to developing this.

http://immortalhair.forumandco.com/t4433-fundementals-of-regeneration-challenge-to-omg-nid-jdp-might-interest-you


Of a suprahuman immensity in a patch of sand or a raptors guileless shivering intensity, I’m only a visitor,
an atom of atoms on a jutting red splattered synagogue of granite as it crouches literally in space
A frozen amoral giant gazing heavenward, forever

 

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# 1 ]

December 29, 2010, 03:06 PM

From Doctor Robert Becker in the early stages of developing this technology.


Dr. Robert O. Becker’s Research

A patient was referred to him as a last resort with a broken right tibia and fibula, both of
which refused to heal and continued to get worse after a year and a half of effort.
The
patient was given no choice but amputation. After a year and a half of treatment with
every available antibiotic,
he talked Dr. Becker into trying his new methods on his leg.
Dr. Becker describes the wound as being “...a veritable zoo (of microbes)...no single
antibiotic could fight all of John’s germs. Even a mixture would probably create a
greater problem than it solved, for any bacteria resistant to the mix would spread like
wildfire when the others competing against them were removed.”
The unhealed bone was
still receding. Dr. Becker had proven in earlier experiments with stainless steel, platinum
and titanium electrodes that a very small negative current helped bone growth. However,
he had recently found that positive silver electrodes killed off bacteria. He felt he had to
make a choice between killing the infections and healing the bone and was afraid if he
treated the infections first he would destroy even more of the little bone that was left.
Still, if he treated the bone first the infections would continue to spread and prevent the
bone growth, probably consuming some more of the bone. He had to make a choice and
decided the infection had to be taken care of first. He “…told John that six months after
we got the wound to heal over with skin, I would bring him back into the hospital and use
the negative current to stimulate whatever is left.” A long slow and risky process.
“...I debrided the wound, removing the dead tissue and all grossly infected or dead bone.
There wasn’t much left afterward. It was an enormous excavation running almost from
his knee to his ankle. In the operating room we soaked a big piece of silver nylon in
saline solution and laid it over the wound…wrapped the leg, and connected the battery
unit. By the end of the week…all of our bacterial cultures were sterile (1)(2).”[4] The
battery attached to the silver nylon produced ionic silver, as Dr. Becker later explained.
In a few days the ionic silver quickly killed off every kind of bacteria all the antibiotics
had failed to kill in a year and a half!

Dr. Becker continues: “The soft healing tissue, called granulation tissue, was spreading
out and covering the bone. In two weeks, the whole base of the wound, which had over
eight square inches of raw bone, was covered by this friendly pink carpet. The skin was
beginning to grow in too, so we could forget about the grafts we thought we’d need to do
(1)(2)(7)(10).”[4] All of this indicates an abundance of dedifferentiated cells (stem cells)
as Dr. Becker then explained.

“I decided to take an X-ray to see how much bone he’d lost.” Dr. Becker was expecting
the bone to be withdrawing due to the positive electrical current: “I could hardly believe
the picture. There was clearly some bone regrowth! I removed the cast, felt the leg, and
found that the pieces were all stuck together. John watched, and when I was done he
lifted his leg into the air triumphantly. I’d never so much enjoyed being wrong (1)(7).”
That is, he was expecting the bone to recede and the process to take about a year to
accomplish what he largely accomplished in two weeks.


Of a suprahuman immensity in a patch of sand or a raptors guileless shivering intensity, I’m only a visitor,
an atom of atoms on a jutting red splattered synagogue of granite as it crouches literally in space
A frozen amoral giant gazing heavenward, forever

 

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# 2 ]

December 29, 2010, 03:10 PM

http://www.space-age.com/NanoSilverStemCellActivation.pdf

This link is not for you if you’re squeamish, as its quite graphic in its depictions of regeneration, but can you imagine harnessing such a technology on the scalp?


Of a suprahuman immensity in a patch of sand or a raptors guileless shivering intensity, I’m only a visitor,
an atom of atoms on a jutting red splattered synagogue of granite as it crouches literally in space
A frozen amoral giant gazing heavenward, forever

 

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FunkyStumpfighter

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# 3 ]

December 29, 2010, 05:49 PM

Honestly, you probably couldn’t pay me to run any amount of current for the amount of time it may take to see results (should results be seen at all) above my nose, let alone on the scalp. Thats beside the point though.

He used a variety of methods to regrow bone, though obviously it’s rather clear which method was the most successful. However, he was working with injuries that innately cause tremendous regeneration responses in the body. A stimulation and differentiation of stem cells would almost certainly have to be caused by something that would bear the necessity for their presence, i.e. you could not get stem cells to differentiate unless the body is releasing the appropriate chemical signals to both tell these cells where to go, but what to turn into. The kind of wound described in the case above would cause a massive response, and given a little help showed what the body is capable of repairing.

That’s just the thing, though. Regeneration on that level takes quite a bit of stimulation. Without that kind of damage, I just don’t think it’s possible to see those kinds of results. There are more than a few different individuals around the net that talk about the same level of regeneration using all kinds of messes, not least of which John Christopher and his bone flesh and cartilage mix. With its anti inflammatory and cell proliferative content, he claimed cases of regeneration that would put Robert Becker’s to shame. Though there are scattered testimonials/claims of regeneration well after the healing response had occurred (J. Christopher’s BF&C mix having been claimed to regrow a surgically diminished knee cap
and having reset an already clumsily healed foot bone long after it had healed wrong), the common theme between these kinds of cases is that they involve large injuries that either haven’t healed, or won’t heal. Given the ability to do so, the tremendous regenerative responses of the body kicked into high gear and allowed the regeneration of healthy tissue that may otherwise not have formed. In fact, many of these cases involve regrowing tissue that wouldn’t have been able to regrow because of the scarring process that the body initiates when there is great injury that needs to be resolved quickly.

With my own experience involving regeneration, I found that the greatest results came from the greatest physical damage caused. I spent about 3 months applying Lugol’s to my scalp, and I can tell you that even though I could see the regenate material below the persistent scab I was sporting, the results as far as hair is concerned were at best modest for the amount of time I used it. This method worked much much better than my experimentation with skin needling and TCA peels, and I attribute this directly to the fact that the Lugol’s initiated a regeneration response, and sustained it for a long period of time. The regeneration of the skin that it caused was impressive, far better than anything anyone is ever likely to buy off the shelf in the form of creams and serums. Lugol’s positively DEMOLISHES wrinkles and stretch marks. I’ve used it on other parts of my body, and the results are nothing short of miraculous. There’s a clear and smooth area on my right shoulder/back that is adrift in a sea of 5 or 6 years worth of cystic acne scars, and thats after just 3 weeks of heavy application.

What I’m saying is that the regeneration itself can actually be wildly simple in our case. Can a weak current and silver cause a stalled healing process to initiate, and possibly enhance that process? The evidence points to yes. Can the same method be used to stimulate large amounts of stem cell migration, then cause differentiation in tissue that is receiving no chemical signalling by which to do so? I have serious doubts as to that, and in my opinion, its hugely unlikely that that is the case. Though I have no experience with using currents and silver to repair skin, I can say that I would place a healthy bet on iodine being exponentially more effective in that regard, the only skin imperfection I have not been able to repair with iodine is my appendectomy scar, which is just a .5 inch by 3 inch mass of scar tissue.

However, if it is established that iodine causes an amassing of stem cells beneath the apoptotic tissue formed, and that a weak current and silver enhances the body’s ability to regenerate when the conditions for regeneration are met, would it be a stretch to think combining them might compound their effects on the skin? Who knows. Personally, I have been using homemade vitamin C serum on my hairline for a few weeks now in preparation for a wounding experiment involving WNT mimicking peptides, so I have no plans on trying it myself. I may even spring for some Acell Matristem powder and see if I can’t really step it up using a substance that has been proven to regrow severed fingertips even after they have already healed. If that doesn’t work, then it’s right on to using iodine again with WNT mimicking peptides on top of it.

In the end, everything is conjecture until someone tries it. The thread over at IH is a good one, but in the end it is a mile of conjecture that gets to be a bit much after a while, especially considering it would be rather simple to erase the bulk of it with just a few failed experiments that would not be all that hard to conduct. This information is out there, and probably pretty well known by the people capable of really putting it to the test for our purposes. I’d rather read about someone with tangible results than bother discussing the ifs for another x amount of months. The more information that gets piled on the more complicated it will get, and if the basic principles can’t first be shown to have merit then everything else is semantical. That’s how I feel about it anyway, it’s not like using an electrical current to grow hair is remotely new, it’s probably the thing that gets lumped into the “it may have merit, but nobody is ever bothering to try it” more than anything else. Forget about the myriad studies on the subject, put it to the test.

 

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# 4 ]

December 29, 2010, 06:33 PM

FunkyStumpfighter - December 29, 2010, 05:49 PM

Honestly, you probably couldn’t pay me to run any amount of current for the amount of time it may take to see results (should results be seen at all) above my nose, let alone on the scalp. Thats beside the point though.

The current is so minute that you would have little to worry about.

He used a variety of methods to regrow bone, though obviously it’s rather clear which method was the most successful. However, he was working with injuries that innately cause tremendous regeneration responses in the body. A stimulation and differentiation of stem cells would almost certainly have to be caused by something that would bear the necessity for their presence, i.e. you could not get stem cells to differentiate unless the body is releasing the appropriate chemical signals to both tell these cells where to go, but what to turn into. The kind of wound described in the case above would cause a massive response, and given a little help showed what the body is capable of repairing.

Becker started this research originally on bones as yes he was an Orthopedic surgeon, and I think you’re missing the fact that we’re not getting stem cells to dedifferentiate, we’re getting scar tissue and regular cells to dedifferentiate into stem cells.  And yes the body is good at repairing injury, but if you looked through the information thoroughly enough you’d know the massive difference between what Becker was doing and what the body is capable alone.

That’s just the thing, though. Regeneration on that level takes quite a bit of stimulation.  Without that kind of damage, I just don’t think it’s possible to see those kinds of results.

No, not as much as one would think, Becker tested currents for a month, working his way down to the number he calculated (200 - 700 picoamps) and didn’t believe in, at which point was dumbfounded to find out how delicate the current was.  Beyond that thorough enzyme topicals, Iodine, and derma rolling before sessions with this idea would set the stage as it would break down tissue in the scalp / fibrosis. 

There are more than a few different individuals around the net that talk about the same level of regeneration using all kinds of messes, not least of which John Christopher and his bone flesh and cartilage mix. With its anti inflammatory and cell proliferative content, he claimed cases of regeneration that would put Robert Becker’s to shame. Though there are scattered testimonials/claims of regeneration well after the healing response had occurred (J. Christopher’s BF&C mix having been claimed to regrow a surgically diminished knee cap
and having reset an already clumsily healed foot bone long after it had healed wrong), the common theme between these kinds of cases is that they involve large injuries that either haven’t healed, or won’t heal. Given the ability to do so, the tremendous regenerative responses of the body kicked into high gear and allowed the regeneration of healthy tissue that may otherwise not have formed. In fact, many of these cases involve regrowing tissue that wouldn’t have been able to regrow because of the scarring process that the body initiates when there is great injury that needs to be resolved quickly.

If you read thoroughly through the information you would not have posted this, there’s a huuuuge difference between what John Christopher was doing and what Becker done.  Yes, you need damage to instigate healing and cellular dedifferentiation, the amount of nerve damage = the current of injury triggered, what I’m talking about doing is mild wounding (enzymes, derma rolling, lugols) and then bypassing Mammalian nerve limitations altogether by instigating the same principles present in fully regenerating animals. 

With my own experience involving regeneration, I found that the greatest results came from the greatest physical damage caused.

Not surprising, I followed that thread actually as I was digging into this research at the time, goes back to Regeneration = (damage)(# of nerves), without any outside stimulation.

I spent about 3 months applying Lugol’s to my scalp, and I can tell you that even though I could see the regenate material below the persistent scab I was sporting, the results as far as hair is concerned were at best modest for the amount of time I used it. This method worked much much better than my experimentation with skin needling and TCA peels, and I attribute this directly to the fact that the Lugol’s initiated a regeneration response, and sustained it for a long period of time. The regeneration of the skin that it caused was impressive, far better than anything anyone is ever likely to buy off the shelf in the form of creams and serums. Lugol’s positively DEMOLISHES wrinkles and stretch marks. I’ve used it on other parts of my body, and the results are nothing short of miraculous. There’s a clear and smooth area on my right shoulder/back that is adrift in a sea of 5 or 6 years worth of cystic acne scars, and thats after just 3 weeks of heavy application.

I’m glad to hear all of this, but applying lugols and what I’m talking about are night and day.  You supplied a wound, yes, and your body responded… what I’m talking to is applying a wound and then an outside source of the exact same signal your body sends when it wants regeneration


What I’m saying is that the regeneration itself can actually be wildly simple in our case. Can a weak current and silver cause a stalled healing process to initiate, and possibly enhance that process?

It’s not a stalled healing process, it’s the fact that mammals lack the nerve density that regenerating animals have, they are the conduit wires if you will.  But Becker proved that you didn’t need them if you just applied the stimulus otherwise.

The evidence points to yes. Can the same method be used to stimulate large amounts of stem cell migration, then cause differentiation in tissue

It’s not stem cell migration, it’s actual cellular dedifferentiation, I posted an excerpt from the book in the IH thread stating this, the cells broke down and de-specialized into the most basic of cells, the beginning of the healing process.

...that is receiving no chemical signalling by which to do so?

It has little to nothing to do with chemical signalling.

I have serious doubts as to that, and in my opinion, its hugely unlikely that that is the case.

Your doubts can be laid to rest.  If you want further proof read The Body Electric

Though I have no experience with using currents and silver to repair skin, I can say that I would place a healthy bet on iodine being exponentially more effective in that regard

Not discarding Lugols for skin regeneration, but lugols effects and the effects of what I’m talking about are worlds apart….

, the only skin imperfection I have not been able to repair with iodine is my appendectomy scar, which is just a .5 inch by 3 inch mass of scar tissue.

However, if it is established that iodine causes an amassing of stem cells beneath the apoptotic tissue formed, and that a weak current and silver enhances the body’s ability to regenerate when the conditions for regeneration are met, would it be a stretch to think combining them might compound their effects on the skin? Who knows.

It’s not “enhancing” anything, it is the body’s ability to regenerate (exact same mechanism), just not direct from the body itself.

Personally, I have been using homemade vitamin C serum on my hairline for a few weeks now in preparation for a wounding experiment involving WNT mimicking peptides, so I have no plans on trying it myself. I may even spring for some Acell Matristem powder and see if I can’t really step it up using a substance that has been proven to regrow severed fingertips even after they have already healed. If that doesn’t work, then it’s right on to using iodine again with WNT mimicking peptides on top of it.

WNT mimicking peptides are definitely going to be a part of this.  But until a fibrosis free scalp is achieved (as with the enzymes, wounding, and dedifferentiation) I can only see them going so far.
Make sure to update us on the Lugol’s / WNT funky! looking forward to it

In the end, everything is conjecture until someone tries it.

This has been tried, for fifty years or more, and it works, we just have to refine it.

The thread over at IH is a good one, but in the end it is a mile of conjecture that gets to be a bit much after a while, especially considering it would be rather simple to erase the bulk of it with just a few failed experiments that would not be all that hard to conduct.

Again… read the body electric.

Becker got almost full limb regeneration in a mammal…

These “experiments” have been done, it’s all laid out.  Whether or not we can achieve full regrowths with it really depend on our tenacity.

This information is out there,

I really don’t understand why, its the exact same principle and mechanism you see in your average regeneration animals…(Whoops, thought you meant that the information is out there as in wacky, haha.

and probably pretty well known by the people capable of really putting it to the test for our purposes.

Like the FDA and Big Pharma?  They would surely make a ton of cash off of patenting a naturally occuring element and electrici…. wait a minute…

I’d rather read about someone with tangible results than bother discussing the ifs for another x amount of months.

That’s fine.  But tangible results often come with great effort.

The more information that gets piled on the more complicated it will get, and if the basic principles can’t first be shown to have merit then everything else is semantical.

Again… been covered, merit a-plenty.

That’s how I feel about it anyway, it’s not like using an electrical current to grow hair is remotely new, it’s probably the thing that gets lumped into the “it may have merit, but nobody is ever bothering to try it” more than anything else. Forget about the myriad studies on the subject, put it to the test.

Absolutely, there’s been a number of crappy electric hair growth schemes but this is quite dissimilar to them, I’ve checked them out.

Putting it to the test starts with fully understanding what I should in fact put to the test, point of me starting this thread and all of this research is to get others involved as to hopefully improve our timeline and payoff.

 


Of a suprahuman immensity in a patch of sand or a raptors guileless shivering intensity, I’m only a visitor,
an atom of atoms on a jutting red splattered synagogue of granite as it crouches literally in space
A frozen amoral giant gazing heavenward, forever

 

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# 5 ]

December 29, 2010, 09:06 PM

And there are many many doctors claiming to have done things equally as miraculous, you should see the proof out there on what low level laser therapy can do. There are differences between them all, but the principle is the same, restoring a damaged body to whole as nature intended. Taking any one of them, The Body Electric for example, isn’t at all a good idea. I’ve spent the last few years reading a lot of alt health lit, and I’ve taken bits and pieces from them all, but I wouldn’t assume any of them ever got the full picture right.

I’m only making 2 points here. The kind of regeneration you’re referencing is occurring where there would already be a huge response by the body, regardless of how well the body would have done without the extra help. If you stimulate any extra stem cells to move to or be created in an area with huge damage, the body will have no problem telling these cells what to turn into. In the scalp, we are trying to potentially regenerate extremely tiny organs in an area where this kind of naturally occurring regenerative response is not present. If silver and electricity can cause cells to differentiate into a specific cell despite the body itself not sending out the appropriate chemical signals that would allow the surround tissue to even realize these cells need to be created in the first place, then awesome. It’d save an entire step in the process if this were to come to fruition. So far, getting the stem cells to where we want them is the easy part, it’s getting them to form small scale complex organs like hair follicles that’s the issue.

Maybe the low intensity electrical current works the same way as low intensity pulsed ultrasound, and stimulates regeneration by triggering the same physical response that damage would, albeit much safer and sustained for longer. There’s proof that LIPUS will go so far as regrow dentin, something someone even as ardent as Barefoot Herbalist might tell you is impossible (or at least very hard, I don’t quite know BH’s stance on dentin). Maybe the magic behind low intensity vibrational stimulation is in the physical action of sustained low intensity energy, and can be achieved with light, sound, or electricity. We already use low level visible light therapy for hair loss, and LIPUS is being used to grow both bone and dental tissues of all kind, it is not far fetched to believe a weak current could do the same. For all we know, the reason why low intensity currents were mostly abandoned or ignored because low intensity laser therapy and low intensity pulsed ultrasound simply work better. The proof behind these things are as amazing as Becker’s are generally, and decades much more recent, but no one is going gaga over using lasers or LIPUS for hair regeneration. Why? Probably because the amazing kind of results you can find on all kinds of things are much harder to replicate consistently, and sometimes almost impossible to replicate. They’re a few cases among many.

My second point is that this is all pure conjecture, same as it’s been as long as I’ve been visiting hair loss forums. No one has ever proven that the very basic premise holds merit, maybe no one has even tried, but there is probably dozens of threads around the net throwing semantics around, and it usually always comes back to “it’s promising, but no one has ever bothered to try”. No amount of written proof that something can regenerate bone/flesh/spirit is worth having someone flat out say “this regenerates hair, let me tell you how I did it”. There is a ton of really convincing evidence that LLLT regenerates all kinds of tissue, not least of which nerve tissue, but ask any one of us using a laser helmet if we have seen brand new hairs form where the follicles have been long “dead”.

 

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# 6 ]

December 29, 2010, 10:40 PM

FunkyStumpfighter - December 29, 2010, 09:06 PM

And there are many many doctors claiming to have done things equally as miraculous, you should see the proof out there on what low level laser therapy can do. There are differences between them all, but the principle is the same,

While many of these things work on similar parts of the body, no, the principles are not the same.


restoring a damaged body to whole as nature intended. Taking any one of them, The Body Electric for example, isn’t at all a good idea. I’ve spent the last few years reading a lot of alt health lit, and I’ve taken bits and pieces from them all, but I wouldn’t assume any of them ever got the full picture right.

I’m only making 2 points here. The kind of regeneration you’re referencing is occurring where there would already be a huge response by the body, regardless of how well the body would have done without the extra help. If you stimulate any extra stem cells to move to or be created in an area with huge damage, the body will have no problem telling these cells what to turn into. In the scalp, we are trying to potentially regenerate extremely tiny organs in an area where this kind of naturally occurring regenerative response is not present. If silver and electricity can cause cells to differentiate into a specific cell despite the body itself not sending out the appropriate chemical signals that would allow the surround tissue to even realize these cells need to be created in the first place, then awesome. It’d save an entire step in the process if this were to come to fruition. So far, getting the stem cells to where we want them is the easy part, it’s getting them to form small scale complex organs like hair follicles that’s the issue.

Again… if you dig into TBE you’ll see that gene expression in terms of what the dedifferentiated cells should turn into is a part of this whole procedure, otherwise how would Becker ever have gotten something as complex as limb Regeneration?

Maybe the low intensity electrical current works the same way as low intensity pulsed ultrasound, and stimulates regeneration by triggering the same physical response that damage would, albeit much safer and sustained for longer.

Just looked into this, no it’s a different deal, might work on some similar mechanisms though.


There’s proof that LIPUS will go so far as regrow dentin, something someone even as ardent as Barefoot Herbalist might tell you is impossible (or at least very hard, I don’t quite know BH’s stance on dentin). Maybe the magic behind low intensity vibrational stimulation is in the physical action of sustained low intensity energy, and can be achieved with light, sound, or electricity. We already use low level visible light therapy for hair loss, and LIPUS is being used to grow both bone and dental tissues of all kind, it is not far fetched to believe a weak current could do the same. For all we know, the reason why low intensity currents were mostly abandoned or ignored because low intensity laser therapy and low intensity pulsed ultrasound simply work better. The proof behind these things are as amazing as Becker’s are generally, and decades much more recent, but no one is going gaga over using lasers or LIPUS for hair regeneration. Why? Probably because the amazing kind of results you can find on all kinds of things are much harder to replicate consistently, and sometimes almost impossible to replicate. They’re a few cases among many.

I’m not sure we can compare LIPUS and lasers with what I’m talking about Funky, though I absolutely believe in those approaches there’s still worlds of difference.  I’ve never seen limb regeneration with lasers.

My second point is that this is all pure conjecture, same as it’s been as long as I’ve been visiting hair loss forums. No one has ever proven that the very basic premise holds merit,

What more do I need to prove? there’s fifty years of research at your fingertips and documented cases of nearly entire limb regeneration in mammals, this technology is in hospitals all over the world being used to heal non-unions and in certain places was used to heal soft tissue such as in one of TBE’s excerpts that I posted with the cancer patient. 

maybe no one has even tried, but there is probably dozens of threads around the net throwing semantics around, and it usually always comes back to “it’s promising, but no one has ever bothered to try”. No amount of written proof that something can regenerate bone/flesh/spirit is worth having someone flat out say “this regenerates hair, let me tell you how I did it”. There is a ton of really convincing evidence that LLLT regenerates all kinds of tissue, not least of which nerve tissue, but ask any one of us using a laser helmet if we have seen brand new hairs form where the follicles have been long “dead”.

Once more with feeling… LLLT and what I’m talking about are night and day.
And yes, totally agree again, proof trumps what I’m currently offering… but how will I get proof to you without first establishing a basis for which to create something like this?  this is the point of the thread, to get real people involved in this who have the know-how in terms of getting things done a la OMG and IH. 

 


Of a suprahuman immensity in a patch of sand or a raptors guileless shivering intensity, I’m only a visitor,
an atom of atoms on a jutting red splattered synagogue of granite as it crouches literally in space
A frozen amoral giant gazing heavenward, forever

 

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# 7 ]

December 31, 2010, 03:10 PM

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Of a suprahuman immensity in a patch of sand or a raptors guileless shivering intensity, I’m only a visitor,
an atom of atoms on a jutting red splattered synagogue of granite as it crouches literally in space
A frozen amoral giant gazing heavenward, forever

 

IGNORE

 
   
 








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