Blood as an indicator to your body’s imbalances?  + Blood tests

   
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cosmos_gab

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March 28, 2012, 02:20 PM

Hi guys,

I’m new here and I’ve started to explore OMG’s laser helmets and the various threads here. Very nice.


1. I was wondering if you had any input on the ideal blood test to help understand what’s the cause of my hair loss.
No limits here. Everything that can be useful.
I’ve been told from someone in the hospital that thet can’t test DHT, only testosterone, is that true?

I’ve already tested Testosterone, thyroid, vitamins and minerals in the past and everything seemed to be in the average.
Anything else specific? Everything you might think that could be useful.


2. A naturopath told me that testing the blood is sometimes not a good way to see what the body is lacking.
The body works hard to reach a certain type of balance in the blood. For instance the pH level of the blood must stay at a strict 7.365. But that doesn’t mean that we’re not acidic. Most of us would test acidic if we tested our urine or saliva.

The same logic would apply for vitamins and minerals or hormones. For instance the body might lack calcium but the blood tests don’t show it because the body is salvaging calcium from bones and other parts of the body.

What do you think about

Thanks guys!
G

 

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cosmos_gab

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# 1 ]

April 10, 2012, 12:57 PM

Anyone?

 

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Lapwing

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April 10, 2012, 04:06 PM

I don’t think blood tests are going to tell you much about your hair loss.  Two simple tests are just testing for diabetes(and/or insulin resistance) and high blood pressure.  Both of these condition correlate with hair loss.  A blood test is not going to determine your dht conversion at your scalp, or genetic sensitivity of your hair follicles.

 

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April 10, 2012, 05:11 PM

Hi Cosmos. Welcome to the forum. I believe blood tests can help to determine things that are contributing to hair loss. Unfortunately there are hundreds of different blood tests that I am aware of. I once owned a book with like 300 pages describing all the possible blood tests and the rational for them. They can test for almost anything. But what blood tests should a doctor order for hair loss? That’s the question. Maybe someone else can add some knowledge to this thread. Certainly certain hormones like Testosterone and DHT as well as testing for thyroid function and vitamin D levels would be a start.

Very few people ever fully utilize conventional medical tests to help them in their fight against hair loss. I myself never did either. Maybe I should have? Maybe I should have searched out a doc that is fully qualified to treat MPB. Maybe we should put our heads together and come up with a list of blood tests we should ask the docs to order? Maybe we should take their hand here.

However if you go see a doc…most of them will probably diagnose you with male pattern baldness then tell you to use minoxidil and or propecia. In many respects, we are on our own here…..and that’s the unfortunate side of conventional medicine. The industry is filled with doctors that really don’t give a damn about their patients. They’re merely in the field to get rich.

 

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April 11, 2012, 01:55 AM

Zix,

Cosmos already checked his Thyroid and T.  The thyroid tests are hard to be accurate and often don’t indicate a problem when there is one. 

You can do a dht test, but it is just going to be circulating dht levels, which supposedly fluctuate a lot though out the day, plus it is not necessarily indicative of the levels secreted in your scalp. 

Get the tests done you want, but most of time they are not going to tell you much.  The best thing is to assume you need to address all health issues associated with MPB.  This way even if you don’t get back your hair at least you win by having great health and therefore should avoid a lot of horrible diseases down the line.  This is the sliver lining.  MPB awaken me to fact I was wrecking my health.  I am so much more healthy and fit now. 

Zix,

I agree about doctors out to get rich, but the whole medical system “forces” doctors to be pill pushers and maximize patient throughput, ie, see each patient for as little as possible and on to next one.  I would not want to be a doctor because you are not allowed to practice medicine the way you want to or the way you think you should.  Huge student loans, eventual big money awards, delayed gratification, and the business model all work to erode the true practice of medicine.

 

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April 12, 2012, 06:04 PM

Hi lapwing. Well I don’t completely agree with you. Concerning the thyroid testing….yea I know, I know the test is not definitive. Well all blood tests are never completely definitive. The test for AIDS is never completely definitive either. Nor is the one for pregnancy. But before I would blast my body with high levels of a supplement I would at least like to know if I have a thyroid problem to begin with. Confirm it with a blood test and then look for physical symptoms can confirm a diagnosis pretty accurately.

Another blood test is a Sed Rate. I mean everyone is running around trying to say that inflammation is a horrible thing. So why not get a sed rate blood test before hand and determine a baseline? Then repeat it in 6 months after taking all those supplements to treat inflammation. Why not see how well they may be working? If they’re not…why not try something else?

SED rate test:
Sed rate, or erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), is a blood test that can reveal inflammatory activity in your body. A sed rate test isn’t a stand-alone diagnostic tool, but the result of a sed rate test may help your doctor diagnose or monitor an inflammatory conditions.

But my post is really about combining some good lab tests with antiaging medicine and supplements. Unfortunately….there seems to be little knowledge or investigation of this idea. If we really researched it….I think we could come up with a protocol and have people get this lab work done. What the protocol would be I have no idea….but I think it’s worthy of study.

Then you go into a young doctor (who doesn’t have many patients) and say. “I’m into antiaging medicine. I was wondering if you could help me with this. Here’s the lab tests I should have to help me judge my treatment protocol”.

This complete and utter disregard for conventional medicine I find to be alarming among many people. Let’s never forget our leader (OMG) would be dead by now without conventional medicine. Is conventional medicine filled with corruption and uncarring doctors? Yes….but if we do our homework we can use conventional medicine to help us.

 

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April 12, 2012, 09:36 PM

I never meant for people to assume they are majorly sick and then blast with supplements.  I think they should assume they are somewhat out of balance.  And then try to achieve maximum health and balance with supplements, diet and lifestyle change.

What I dislike is that there is this stigma attached to going bald, and that one is obviously sick or has bad habits, etc.  As if it is your fault.  I see many fat unhealthy people practicing the most unhealthy lifestyles and still have a full head of hair.  MPB is genetic thing that gets tilted by slight imbalances more than it is a symptom of some big disease or a majorly malfunctioning organ.  Doctor tests are not going to catch that.  You take a normal 20 or 30 something year old guy who is losing his hair and statistically speaking most tests aren’t going to show much. 

Nothing wrong to go to doctor.  When you got some major illness or injury by all means please go.  I definitely do.

 

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April 13, 2012, 03:58 PM

I think there could be more help from conventional medicine than we realize. We just need to come up with a protocol. We lack the ability to fully measure the effect of our efforts to become healthier.

For example. If your BUN and creat are lower 6 months after we started our supplements….well then I think it’s pretty safe to assume our kidneys are functioning better. If our liver enzymes are lower….well then I think it’s safe to assume our liver has regressed in age. If our sed rate is improved then I think it’s safe to assume that our efforts to reduce inflammation have worked. If our HGBA1C has improved, I think it’s safe to assume that our blood glucose levels have improved. If we’ve improved all these things then I think we will see this materialize into better hair.

The first problem is finding a doctor that will cooperate with our efforts. The second problem is knowing what tests to ask for from the doctor. But it may very well be worth the effort.

My problem is that I hate going to a doctor. Even if I know they can help me! I hate lining their pockets with more wealth. But I do realize this is a stupid attitude to have.

You have to understand that I believe bullshit is not limited merely to conventional medicine. Much of the alternative medical people are full of shit as well. We have to weed through it. Checking certain blood levels could help us to do this.

 

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Lapwing

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April 13, 2012, 04:14 PM

Zix,

If I was lot richer I would do something like you suggest.  It would be cool to get real numbers and chart them throughout time and see how you are doing.  I would also like to go to a hair specialist and have my NW rated over time and track that as well.  It is hard to be objective in these things by yourself.

 

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April 13, 2012, 06:05 PM

Same here man. Do I do any of the things I’m suggesting? No! LOL!

But I don’t think it would cost all that much. If you have health insurance and your doctor orders those blood tests then it should be basically free. Your only talking one blood draw and maybe 3-4 different blood tests and it would cover everything I mentioned. A BMP, HgbA1c, Sed rate, and Liver Enzymes. They are also very common blood tests. Except for the sed rate, doctors order them all the time. Even the sed rate is not that unusual. The BMP would also cover all the electrolytes too. Then if you’re overdosing on the mag oil you would at least know it before you cause kidney damage.

 

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April 15, 2012, 07:29 PM

I pulled this off a message board and I wanted to get it on this thread. The list of lab work is ridiculously extensive. But I’m sort of looking for a new hobby. If I get time maybe I could weed through all this and come up with a shorter list. Something we could take to the docs and ask for:

This is a fairly comprehensive list and seems comparable to others I’ve seen. One doc, Dr. Karlis Ullis, orders assessment for heavy metals also.

 


Evaluations
Blood Tests

Male Menopause

HGH/Hormone Balancing



CHI Baseline Laboratory Tests
Order your Anti-Aging blood tests through us! No matter where you are in North America, we will coordinate the testing for you.

For Women For Men
General

CBC
Comprehensive Metabolic Panel
Lipid Profile (fasting)
Homocysteine (fasting)
Cardio C-Reactive Protein (fasting)
Fasting Insulin
Hemoglobin A1C
CA-125
Magnesium
AA/EPA Ratio (Special Order Form) General

CBC
Comprehensive Metabolic Panel
Lipid Profile (fasting)
Homocysteine (fasting)
Cardio C-Reactive Protein (fasting)
Fasting Insulin
Hemoglobin A1C
Magnesium
AA/EPA Ratio (Special Order Form)
Thyroid Tests

Free T3
Free T4
TSH Thyroid Tests

Free T3
Free T4
TSH
Hormones

Free & Total Testosterone
SHBG
DHEA Sulfate
IGF1 (Somatomedin C)
Estradiol
Progesterone
FSH
LH Hormones

Free & Total Testosterone
SHBG
DHEA Sulfate
IGF1 (Somatomedin C)
Estradiol
FSH
LH
Bone Density

N-Telopeptides [Osteoporosis Urine Screen] Prostate

PSA
Free PSA

Bone Density

N-Telopeptides [Osteoporosis Urine Screen]


Optional but Recommended (Men & Women)

Pantox Lipid & Vitamin Screen (fasting)
Pantox Vitamin Screen only
Berkely Heart Panel if needed for further Lipid Analysis

 

 

Descriptions of Lab Tests


General Lab tests (go to top)


CBC = Complete Blood Count
This test measures Red Blood Cells and if low indicates anemia. White blood cells and type of white blood cells are measured and this information may indicate viral illness or bacterial infection or parasite infection. Blood Platelets are one component of the clotting of blood.

Comprehensive metabolic panel
This lab test measures the electrolytes in the blood including sodium and potassium. Blood sugar (glucose) is measured which can indicate hypoglycemia or diabetes. Liver function and kidney function is measured. Cardiovascular risk lab tests Half of all myocardial infarctions (heart attacks) occur in persons with normal cholesterol. Due to this fact additional lab tests are required to asses cardiovascular risk

Lipid profile
Cholesterol (HDL and LDL, “good” and “bad” cholesterol) Triglycerides

Homocysteine
A toxic amino acid that damages coronary arteries and may be a more important risk factor for heart disease than cholesterol. This is an important anti-aging biomarker because it also measures state of protection of your DNA. Can be controlled with B vitamins and other neutraceuticals.

C-Reactive Protein
Measures inflammation in coronary arteries and may be a more important risk factor for heart disease than cholesterol. See New England Journal of Medicine, March 2000

Hormone levels (go to top)
Since the decline in hormone levels is one of the principal causes of aging, and since we can reverse these declines safely with bio-identical hormones, these tests are an essential component of your anti-aging program.

Testosterone and Free Testosterone
Testosterone is a vital hormone in women as well as men. Not just a sex hormone but necessary for proper functioning of every cell in the body. It is protective against heart disease and type 2 diabetes in men. It is necessary for libido, sense of well being, muscle strength and prevention of osteoporosis in women. Testosterone is bound by Sex Hormone Binding Globulin (SHBG) which makes most of the hormone unavailable to our bodies. It is essential to measure the “Free Testosterone” to know how much active testosterone is present.

Dihydro Testosterone (DHT)
This stronger form of testosterone is made from testosterone by the action of an enzyme called 5-alpha reductase. There is controversy over the role of DHT. If the levels are high it can be controlled with neutraceuticals or medicines.

DHEA, DHEA Sulfate
DHEA is the adrenal hormone that is most plentiful in the body. The DHEA Sulfate test measures the stable form of DHEA and more useful than a DHEA level. This hormone can be bought in the US without a prescription but the only way to keep the blood level of the hormone in the ideal range is by accurate testing.

IGF-1 (Insulin like growth factor 1)
This lab test is essential to measure the level of human growth hormone (HGH) in the body. Although HGH got its name because it makes children grow, it is essential for healthy and happy adult life. Replacement therapy with bio-identical HGH can have profound effects on slowing and even reversing aging. Since HGH only lasts in the blood about 5 minutes after it is released by the pituitary gland, it is very difficult to measure. An indirect method of measuring it is IGF-1. One of the effects of HGH is to cause the production of IGF-1 in the liver. By measuring IGF-1 we can tell how much growth hormone you are producing and whether you are a candidate for HGH replacement therapy.

IGF-BP3 (IGF Binding Protein 3)
This is one of the proteins that carries IGF-1 in the blood. It is associated with protection from cancer.

Thyroid tests (go to top)

(Free T3, Free T4, TSH)
These tests measure the free portions of T3 and T4 which are bioactive. Many people who are on thyroid replacement therapy with synthroid (just T4) do not have adequate T3. Some people who have thyroid tests in the vast “normal” range can benefit from bio-identical thyroid replacement therapy with T3 and T4 and improve lipid profile, migraine headaches, energy level, cold intolerance and weight control.

Estradiol
Estradiol or E2 is one of the three estrogens produced in premenopausal women. Decreased E2 can cause menopausal symptoms of hot flashes and loss of well being. It is necessary for brain function, prevention of cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis, Alzheimer’s dementia, and vaginal dryness. Perimenopausal women may have decreased E2. Estradiol within a certain range is also necessary for brain and other functions in men. If Estradiol is too high in men, decreased Testosterone production can result. This can be controlled with vitamins and neutraceuticals or medicines. Replacement therapy should be with bio-identical natural hormones not artificial hormones or hormones obtained from horses. Levels will vary with the menstrual cycle and cycling women should ideally have this lab test drawn on day 21-25 of their cycle.

Progesterone
Progesterone also decreases in the Perimenopausal period. It is necessary to maintain well being and to prevent emotional swings. Postmenopausal women on estrogen replacement therapy require progesterone therapy as well to prevent uterine cancer. Replacement therapy should be with bio-identical natural hormones not artificial hormones.

FSH and LH (Follicle Stimulating Hormone and Lutenizing Hormone)
These pituitary hormones stimulate the gonadal hormones of estrogen and progesterone in women and testosterone in men. These lab tests are useful in assessing Perimenopausal status and in diagnosing the cause of low testosterone in men

Cancer Screen (go to top)

Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA)
This is a screening test for prostate cancer that men over 40 should have every year. Other cancer screening tests can be ordered on an individual basis.

Vitamin levels (go to top)

Pantox profile
This test measures key vitamin levels such as coenzyme q10 and the carotenes and can be used to asses the supplements that you are taking and your need for specific vitamins.

 

 

 

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April 15, 2012, 07:35 PM

Lapwing…now if you notice the list above (written by an antiaging medical doctor) he is advocating blood tests for the thyroid. I don’t agree with the argument that testing the thyroid first and then again after supplement treatment is a waste of time.

For example what if our levels have not improved? Do we keep taking the supplements to improve the thyroid? Perhaps our money is better spent trying to fix some other area in our physiology? Furthermore….why treat a perfectly fine thyroid to begin with? Or perhaps a better approach would to be much less aggressive with the dosage we are using to do so?

I’m not trying to come off as an expert here. I really simply don’t know the answers to these questions.

 

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April 15, 2012, 07:38 PM

Maybe the best answer is to simply seek out a physician that specializes in antiaging medicine to begin with? Most health insurance will pay for any lab test a doctor orders anyway so cost for most people would be irrelevant. Right now we are all doing a hit or miss approach to the whole situation. We’re all probably treating things we don’t have a problem with and not treating areas we are weak in.

Another problem or fear I have is that EVERYTHING at the right dose can be toxic. Even oxygen! Even water! This toxic dose can be different for all of us as well. Give one person a gallon of water to drink and they may go into congestive heart failure and die. Give someone else that much water and they will simply spend a lot of time running to the bathroom. Give another person that much water and after it has cleared their system they will find their high blood pressure has improved because of the sodium loss.

The point is….all of us need to get more scientific about things. Including myself! Now in my case I can tell you from experience that eating 3 pieces of Pizza is infinitely more damaging and dangerous for me than eating a gallon of ice cream. Why is that? Because my body does just fine with sugar and fats….at least in the short run. But Pizza is loaded with sodium and will raise my blood pressure 10 points within 2-3 hours.

Now I’m not jumping on immortal hair here or nidhogge. They’re right! If you want to fully treat our hair loss we have to consider the whole body. I just think we need some lab tests to confirm that are efforts (and supplements) are helping.

 

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April 15, 2012, 10:22 PM

Zix,

Nice list!  I want to do something like this soon.  I think it is good idea to get baseline numbers for myself.  I feel like my thyroid is ok so I don’t really treat it.  I feel that can be dangerous.  I get adequate iodine in my diet I think plus I don’t have any major symptoms. 

Cheese is awful to my body too.  I just don’t eat pizza anymore, maybe one or two slices in a year now.  Plus I have been eating vegan for a while.  I ate some guacamole tonight and it was loaded with salt.  Why?  I hate it, I am trying to eat healthy and they had to go load a good thing with a ton of sodium and ruin all the health benefits.

Anyway I will try to get an extensive blood test in the next couple of months.  Great idea.  It may not translate into more hair, but hey at least I will have baseline numbers for when I get older and I am facing more critical diseases.  I will post my blood test results as well, if they are not too embarrassing. 

 

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April 16, 2012, 02:47 PM

You know what? From a purely practical standpoint, I’d be willing to bet that if you simply eat less food and that food contained a high percentage of fresh fruit and vegetables. Then followed that up with a good exercise program…...you’d probably do better than taking every supplement known to man.

But who wants to do that? I do OK on the exercise part but don’t eat too many fruits and veggies. But in my experience…..even eating well does not come even remotely close to how well I feel from doing exercise. For me it’s better to eat crap food and exercise than to eat totally healthy and not exercise.

I’ve tried going vegan and not exercise. Doesn’t work as well as eating a normal Amercian diet and exercising. As far as I can tell, exercise is the most important thing in maintaining health.

 

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April 17, 2012, 02:17 PM

Zix,

I don’t know.  My older brother eats a normal American diet and exercises and he is getting that middle age gut and his overall health is steadily going down hill.  He was incredible fit when he was younger.  I think it is more of recipe for more of the same.  The American western diet is good for sports when you are young and super active but not kind to you as you get older in spite of continued exercise.  I do agree though that exercise is super important in any case.  I exercise a lot myself several times a week with weights, some yoga, and cardio type sports stuff.

 

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April 17, 2012, 03:20 PM

Well I’ve been running 7.2 miles a day, 5-6 days a week. I also do a moderate amount of wind sprints during my run. I personally don’t know of any 52 year olds that are capable of that. I eat the typical American crapola diet and I feel pretty good. For me it’s more about how much I eat as opposed to what I eat.

I was having some joint problems from this a year or so ago….but I figured out it was the running shoes I was using.

I’m not saying eating well doesn’t help. I’m just saying that for me personally it won’t help nearly as much as exercise. Nor will vitamin supplements. So for me I would prioritize it like this.

Most important: Exercise
Second most important: Eat less.
Third most important: Eat healthier.
4th most important: Get adequate sleep and sunlight.
5th most important: Take certain nutritional supplements.

Avoiding stress would be high on the list as well but I don’t know how to accomplish this. Being an RN is stressful…...and there doesn’t seem to be anything I can really do about that. That just seems to be my personal list. Everyone is different.

 

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April 17, 2012, 04:06 PM

Well I guess if you exercise like that you can eat anything you want.  That is awesome Zix.  That is Jack LaLanne like.  I just got a quick blurb on Jack’s list since this reminded me of him.  See pasted below:

Even in his nineties, Jack (LaLanne) was a living testimony to the value of regular exercise and a healthful lifestyle. He was for many years a vegan (no meat, dairy, or eggs), but in his later years, though he still ate no dairy products―“anything that comes from a cow, I don’t eat”― he occasionally ate egg whites and wild fish. Mostly, he ate organic raw fruits and vegetables. And he took vitamins.

His vibrant message was that it’s never too late to get in shape. “Those who begin to exercise regularly, and replace white flour, sugar, and devitalized foods with live, organic, natural foods, begin to feel better immediately,” he said. He emphasized that it takes both nutrition and exercise. “There are so many health nuts out there who eat nothing but natural foods but they don’t exercise and they look terrible. Then there are other people who exercise like a son-of-a-gun but eat a lot of junk. . . . Exercise is king. Nutrition is queen. Put them together and you’ve got a kingdom!”

 

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April 17, 2012, 04:20 PM

Yea I liked Jack La Lane too. He used to say…“I can’t die, it would ruin my image!”

Your post makes me wonder however. What if I exercised like I’m doing and then ate well?

 

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April 24, 2012, 11:08 AM

Woah guys!

I thought I had subscribed to this thread and since I wasn’t receiving any replies after my second post, I assumed nobody had answered!!
Sorry for my absence.

Great discussion here Zix and Lapwing.

For your information I’ve been a a vegetarian for a few years and vegan for 3 years. I finished gradually switching to raw also 18 months ago.
The worst my hair has ever been was when I did a detox/cleanse to finish off my transition to a raw diet. I saw my hair get thinner in a matter of days and I lost a lot of them. After that I decided to shave my head off.

I still believe in the benefits of eating raw. I believe this happened as a result of the detox process.

Has being vegan improved my life? Yes. A lot.
Has it cured all my health problems and hair problems? No.
Have I been exercising on a regular basis. Not at all. I guess I’m one of those…

Reading this thread gave me a kick in the butt to start exercising regularly. I’ve known about it but done nothing much to change it. Thanks for this.


Concerning the blood tests, first what is a NW rating from a hair specialist that you spoke about?

Good idea on monitoring the liver and organs with tests like BUN and creat.
These + BMP, HgbA1c, Sed rate (didn’t know about that. good idea…) and Liver enzymes are great suggestions too.

Some of those tests are aimed at monitoring the effects of the supplements you guys are recommending right?

The thing also is that I’m from Canada and doing almost any kind of blood tests is free. So sky is the limit but too much can be well… too much. So I think it would a good idea to isolate a few major.
What else would be more relevant to add to the list from the one Zix linked?

Let’s do a first version of the “MBP blood list” and evolve from there… wink

Since I’m new here I haven’t been following the protocols, getting the supplements recommended, etc. so I’d be a good lab rat for these blood tests monitoring.

 

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April 24, 2012, 11:10 AM

Since the subject of longevity has also been touched here, I encourage you to watch this TED talk.
This guy studied the places in the world where people live the longest and tried to find correlations. (Yes diet AND the amount we eat is one of the keys)
http://www.ted.com/talks/dan_buettner_how_to_live_to_be_100.html


I also would love if you could you tell me a little bit about your MPB experience and and what you’ve been doing and the results you’ve been experiencing.

Zix I know you created this product. What’s been your experience with your MPB? Have you stopped losing your hair. Have you got some of it back? Are you doing LLLT? What do you think is the single most import thing that you’ve been doing?

What about you Lapwing?
There is a lot of great stuff here but haven’t read that much about people’s longterm results and achievement in their MPB battle.
I’d love to hear from you.

 

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April 24, 2012, 11:18 PM

Hi Cosmos. I’ve been thinking about this thread for the last couple of days. Being pragmatic, I think the best way to proceed with the lab work is to simply get on the internet and try to find a physician that specializes in antiaging medicine. How this would work in Canada I have no idea. Certainly if those type physicians exist in the U.S. they would be in Canada too. I just don’t know how your healthcare system works. Can you choose any doctor you want and that bill will be paid for by your health insurance? If you had to pay for this stuff yourself it would end up costing you a small fortune.

If you pursue this course of action, I for one would be very interested in what lab work the physician actually orders for you.

The point I was making is perhaps we should put our research efforts into determining a “blood work protocol” for our hair and for antiaging purposes. I have not done this nor do I really have the time. So I was recommending it be pursued by others. It seems to me we spend most of our time trying to decide what vitamin supplements to take but little time trying to determine if they are helping. Seems to me we need a baseline and a way to measure our efforts at keeping our hair and our health.

Super Zix II….. I think we have enough of a track record to say that it helps for a lot of people. Of course not everyone however. Also it is no miracle treatment because there are no miracle treatments. If you read the product review on this site I think you will get the answers about the formula that you are looking for. Here’s the link:

http://www.worldhairloss.org/index.php/hairloss/page2-productreviews/superzix_ii_a_homemade_topical_that_can_compete_with_the_big_boys

Best of luck.

 

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HAIR LOSS NEWS, TREATMENTS, SOLUTIONS, AND FORUMS.